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sb:recommended:wii [2017/05/23 05:22]
gatotsu2501
sb:recommended:wii [2017/05/23 05:23] (current)
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     * Levi: Jumping is good. Jumping off of really high places is good. The battle system is like //​[[game:​Final Fantasy XII]]// run through the filter of people considering what would make something like this interesting. The game is generous. It's open in a curiously satisfying, direct way. You can just start swimming and climb up on an abandoned highway structure and get your shit totally wrecked by a giant bird. A lot of monsters just want to hang out, and don't pick fights unless you start shit with them. The extremely low resolution textures on the characters faces remind me pleasantly of //​[[game:​Megaman Legends]]// or //​[[game:​Vagrant Story]]// or something. The cutscenes are not an hour long. I hate [[company:​Bioware]] and [[company:​Bethesda]]. I like the hero's sweaters, and how he does the "​[[character:​citan_uzuki|Citan]] thinking"​ pose as an idle animation (what a fantastic and subtle fanservice that is!) I'm mildly frightened that some of the things I find novel about it's approach are from //​[[game:​World of Warcraft]]//​ or something, but I'm blissfully ignorant of that game. The skies are very very blue.     * Levi: Jumping is good. Jumping off of really high places is good. The battle system is like //​[[game:​Final Fantasy XII]]// run through the filter of people considering what would make something like this interesting. The game is generous. It's open in a curiously satisfying, direct way. You can just start swimming and climb up on an abandoned highway structure and get your shit totally wrecked by a giant bird. A lot of monsters just want to hang out, and don't pick fights unless you start shit with them. The extremely low resolution textures on the characters faces remind me pleasantly of //​[[game:​Megaman Legends]]// or //​[[game:​Vagrant Story]]// or something. The cutscenes are not an hour long. I hate [[company:​Bioware]] and [[company:​Bethesda]]. I like the hero's sweaters, and how he does the "​[[character:​citan_uzuki|Citan]] thinking"​ pose as an idle animation (what a fantastic and subtle fanservice that is!) I'm mildly frightened that some of the things I find novel about it's approach are from //​[[game:​World of Warcraft]]//​ or something, but I'm blissfully ignorant of that game. The skies are very very blue.
     * negativedge:​ //​Xenoblade//​ is a lost game from the year 2000---which is not to say it plays like a //​[[game:​Chrono Cross]]// or what have you, but rather that it plays and acts like you'd have imagined games were going to play and act if you were playing a lot of JRPGs in the years 1997-2000. It's world design is an evolution of the //​[[game:​Xenogears]]/​[[game:​grandia_series|Grandia]]//​ style of stuff that I was always in love with, and the battle system and all that feels like where the genre was supposed to go (though there are reservations,​ here---it'​s clearly more of a "lets copy MMOs" than a "lets critically think about JRPGs from the ground up"). It's as blue skies as video games can get. The environments are really smart, because they'​re "​huge"​ in a way that isn't even really huge---it'​s hard to describe. Like, it's not so much that the surface area itself is mathematically as big as something like an //​[[game:​the_elder_scrolls_series|Elder Scrolls]]// game, or that it is particularly open, but rather that it is just enough of these things, and then the sense of scale does the rest. The town you start in is situated in a valley, only the valley is large enough that it doesn'​t feel artificial---it doesn'​t feel like it is a valley because they needed someplace isolated to keep you on target, and it doesn'​t feel like it's a valley because the hardware isn't powerful enough to give you a draw distance miles away. It just feels like a valley. The sides of the surrounding cliffs and mountains are huge. When you climb a few of the overlooking areas, the town below you looks small not because it's a small town (it's a fairly large JRPG town, even if you can't enter any god damn buildings), but because you're really high up and everything else is bigger than the town. When you jump off of that cliff into the water below it's just about the greatest thing. When you finally leave that starting area and its associated dungeon, two things happen: first, you get a fantastic view of one of the giant robots that makes up the game's world (which is just weird enough to be delightful);​ second, you spill out into a giant fucking plain replete with herds of elephant things and rolling hills and Fuck Yes.     * negativedge:​ //​Xenoblade//​ is a lost game from the year 2000---which is not to say it plays like a //​[[game:​Chrono Cross]]// or what have you, but rather that it plays and acts like you'd have imagined games were going to play and act if you were playing a lot of JRPGs in the years 1997-2000. It's world design is an evolution of the //​[[game:​Xenogears]]/​[[game:​grandia_series|Grandia]]//​ style of stuff that I was always in love with, and the battle system and all that feels like where the genre was supposed to go (though there are reservations,​ here---it'​s clearly more of a "lets copy MMOs" than a "lets critically think about JRPGs from the ground up"). It's as blue skies as video games can get. The environments are really smart, because they'​re "​huge"​ in a way that isn't even really huge---it'​s hard to describe. Like, it's not so much that the surface area itself is mathematically as big as something like an //​[[game:​the_elder_scrolls_series|Elder Scrolls]]// game, or that it is particularly open, but rather that it is just enough of these things, and then the sense of scale does the rest. The town you start in is situated in a valley, only the valley is large enough that it doesn'​t feel artificial---it doesn'​t feel like it is a valley because they needed someplace isolated to keep you on target, and it doesn'​t feel like it's a valley because the hardware isn't powerful enough to give you a draw distance miles away. It just feels like a valley. The sides of the surrounding cliffs and mountains are huge. When you climb a few of the overlooking areas, the town below you looks small not because it's a small town (it's a fairly large JRPG town, even if you can't enter any god damn buildings), but because you're really high up and everything else is bigger than the town. When you jump off of that cliff into the water below it's just about the greatest thing. When you finally leave that starting area and its associated dungeon, two things happen: first, you get a fantastic view of one of the giant robots that makes up the game's world (which is just weird enough to be delightful);​ second, you spill out into a giant fucking plain replete with herds of elephant things and rolling hills and Fuck Yes.
-    * Ni Go Zero Ichi: I really want to like this game, because I like Monolith Soft and I like that the entire project was conceived as an abstract visual that came to Tetsuya Takahashi in a dream or something like that. In keeping with its graphic origins, 99% of the developers'​ effort seems to have gone into crafting really big, visually and spatially coherent environments and somehow getting them to run in real time on the Wii. It's too bad so many aspects of the game beyond that feel like the worst sort of quantity-over-quality checkbox open-world RPG bullshit. There are like 20 different abstract mechanical systems inside and outside combat, each and every one of which carries the intuitive weight and visceral satisfaction of watching inscrutable large numbers go up and down on a menu screen. I don't know how many of this game's design and structural ideas are just carbon copied from Bethesda and //WoW// but they sure wear out their welcome here. Previous //Xeno// games gave you worlds with intricate 4,000 year backstories but only let you run down straight metallic corridors and watch poorly edited cutscenes; this one has wide open environments and a million zillion sidequests and still manages to feel shallow and underdeveloped after 100+ hours of play. Uour party members are CONSTANTLY squawking generic animu dialogue in battle yet each one of them has roughly the personality and appeal of a brick. The entire game is set on the dormant continent-sized bodies of warring primal gods and 99% of the NPC sidequests (of which there are literally hundreds) can't think of anything more interesting to have you do than Collect 5 Shitberries from the Fuckgoblin so some guy can do his laundry. The sequel for Wii U (//​Xenoblade X//) is slightly better IMO because it leans even heavier into the open world sandbox exploration aspect the first game is naturally pushing towards, but it still has a lot of the same flaws.+    * Ni Go Zero Ichi: I really want to like this game, because I like Monolith Soft and I like that the entire project was conceived as an abstract visual that came to Tetsuya Takahashi in a dream or something like that. In keeping with its graphic origins, 99% of the developers'​ effort seems to have gone into crafting really big, visually and spatially coherent environments and somehow getting them to run in real time on the Wii. It's too bad so many aspects of the game beyond that feel like the worst sort of quantity-over-quality checkbox open-world RPG bullshit. There are like 20 different abstract mechanical systems inside and outside combat, each and every one of which carries the intuitive weight and visceral satisfaction of watching inscrutable large numbers go up and down on a menu screen. I don't know how many of this game's design and structural ideas are just carbon copied from Bethesda and //WoW// but they sure wear out their welcome here. Previous //Xeno// games gave you worlds with intricate 4,000 year backstories but only let you run down straight metallic corridors and watch poorly edited cutscenes; this one has wide open environments and a million zillion sidequests and still manages to feel shallow and underdeveloped after 100+ hours of play. Your party members are CONSTANTLY squawking generic animu dialogue in every battle yet each one of them has roughly the personality and appeal of a brick. The entire game is set on the dormant continent-sized bodies of warring primal gods and 99% of the NPC sidequests (of which there are literally hundreds) can't think of anything more interesting to have you do than Collect 5 Shitberries from the Fuckgoblin so some guy can do his laundry. The sequel for Wii U (//​Xenoblade X//) is slightly better IMO because it leans even heavier into the open world sandbox exploration aspect the first game is naturally pushing towards, but it still has a lot of the same flaws.
  
   ***//Zack & Wiki: Quest for Barbaros'​ Treasure / Treasure Island Z: Barbaros'​ Secret Treasure (JP)//**   ***//Zack & Wiki: Quest for Barbaros'​ Treasure / Treasure Island Z: Barbaros'​ Secret Treasure (JP)//**
 
 sb/recommended/wii.txt · Last modified: 2017/05/23 05:23 by gatotsu2501
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